This Site is in Under Construction

Malaysia’s Fisheries Department denies pig DNA found in squid rings

Date:

KUALA LUMPUR: After social media posts claiming that squid rings sold in the market were made from pig intestines went viral Malaysia’s Fisheries Department (DOF) has confirmed no pig DNA was detected in frozen squid ring samples.

The main reason pork (big meat) is forbidden for Muslims is because it says in the Holy Quran that some food is allowed, while others are explicitly declared forbidden (haram). And pork is one of those forbidden foods.

Pork is not dirty but rather regarded as impure, unhealthy, and harmful for humans due to the fats, toxins, and bacteria it contains and the way the pig spends its life rolling around in mud and its own excrement. The specific aspect that pork is unhealthy has even been proven by scientists, such as Hans-Heinrich Reckeweg, who argued that western populations who eat pork carry more diseases than other populations who do not eat pork.

Deputy director-general of Fisheries (Management) Mohd Sufian Sulaiman said that the department had carried out a porcine analysis on samples of squid rings at the Kuala Lumpur Fisheries Biosecurity Centre’s laboratory. 

“The DOF can stress that some samples of frozen squid rings that are in high demand from local consumers are safe to be consumed and do not contain pig DNA,” Mohd Sufian. 

The test results will be sent to the Department of Islamic Development Malaysia (Jakim) for further action, he added. 

Recently, allegations that squid rings sold in the market were made from pig intestines and mixed with squid flavour had gone viral on social media.

Mohd Sufian stressed that the biosecurity centre is the body responsible for ensuring the safety and quality of seafood consumed by Malaysians.

The centre makes sure that seafood in the market and those imported into Malaysia are free of disease and prohibited contents, he said, adding that it also ensures breeders comply with international regulations. 

“For seafood products that want to be exported, these farmers need to obtain a fish safety certificate and a certificate free of prohibited substances before they can export the product,” he said. 

Mohd Sufian advised members of the public not to spread fake information as it could cause alarm and doubts among consumers. 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Share post:

Subscribe

spot_img

Popular

More like this
Related

THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY’S AGENDA FOR ECONOMIC REFORMS IN PAKISTAN

Salutations Karachi Editors Club and Live Rostrum and guests.Prelude...

World’s biggest producer Indonesia faces palm-oil crisis

JAKARTA: In mid-march Izawati Dewi, a mother of one, began...

Iran slams new US sanctions amid nuke deal uncertainty

TEHRAN: The spokesperson for Iran's Foreign Ministry, Saeed Khatibzadeh, dismissed...